Softball

Softball is a variant of baseball played with a larger ball on a smaller field. There are two types of softball. In the most common type, slow-pitch softball, the ball, sometimes larger than the standard 12 inches, must arch on its path to the batter; there are 10 players in a team; and bunting and stealing are prohibited. In fast-pitch softball, the pitch is fast, there are 9 players on the field at one time, and bunting and stealing are permitted. Softball rules vary somewhat from those of baseball.

 

Two major differences are that the ball must be pitched underhand—from 46 ft. for men or 43 ft. for women as compared with 60.5 ft. in baseball—and that seven innings instead of nine constitute a regulation game.

 

Softball players can present with various mental obstacles as the game requires quick decisions under pressure. Players need to be able to transition back and forth between offensive and defensive skills as the innings change, which requires a great deal of mental flexibility.

 

Softball Game

Common psychological obstacles that can occur:

  • Anxiety (physical and mental)

  • Uneven performance between practice and game situations

  • Fear

  • Poor self-talk

  • Trouble performing under pressure

  • Difficulty overcoming mistakes

  • Confidence

  • Attention and focus deficits

  • Recovering from an injury

  • Optimal performance training

 

If you believe you or your child may be battling with mental obstacles that could be affecting their overall athletic performance, please call MVP Mentality today. Dr. Hennessy can help athletes of any age and level to optimize their performance on and off the field with cutting edge tactics.

 

With a unique therapy plan designed on a per-patient basis, she knows that the right therapy makes all the difference. Call today at 954-317-0551 or email her at DrLaurenHennessy@gmail.com.

 

For more information regarding mental blocks in Softball, check out the links below:

 

How Detrimental is Anxiety in Sports?

Neurofeedback can Optimize Athletic Performance

Is Sports Psychology Right for My Child?